iiwasalwaysthequeen

I was always the Queen...

161,620 notes

2damnfeisty:

rozhanitsa:

2damnfeisty:

Nobody gives the black girl mob credit for being smart as fuck. They clown but at the end of the day they are really intelligent.

And it’s not subtle at all.
Taystee is a math prodigy in addition to being well-read, Poussey is multilingual, Cindy just knows shit, Suzanne studies Shakespeare, Watson was a good student in addition to being a track star, Vee is basically an evil genius. Piper often learns the most from them; they taught her how to fight and helped translate Pennsatucky’s biblical threat.
The show flat out acknowledges the (academic) intelligence of the black inmates time and time again, but the audience collectively ignores it.

ALL OF THIS

(Source: ageofdesiderata, via arsyn-in-heaven)

Filed under oitnb orange is the new black

113,423 notes

matt112830:

sharplydressedtentacles:

banesidhe:

calming-tea:

samrgarrett:

outofthecavern:

opiatevampire:

theworldisconfused:

In addition to essentially inventing the computer, Alan Turing also broke the German Enigma Code during World War II which paved the way for the D-Day invasion. The man was a hyper-genius. I’ve read descriptions of his work by mathematical physicist Sir Roger Penrose. He’s been a hero of mine ever since.
The level of thought required to come up with the stuff he came up with is totally beyond my comprehension. I actually did not even know about his orientation until much later. He was prosecuted and ordered to undergo chemical castration. Soon thereafter, he committed suicide by eating a cyanide-laced apple.

The government forced him to take estrogen as a punishment (or “cure”?). He began to develop breasts and other side effects.
He committed suicide by biting into a cyanide laced apple. This is supposedly the inspiration for the name/logo of Apple computers.

omfg
omfg
and old Apple computers
the apple was a rainbow 







Reblogging again because more people need to know about Turing dammit.

Whoa…

(CNN) — If beauty is indeed truth, as John Keats claimed, then this story ought to be true: The logo on the back of your iPhone or Mac is a tribute to Alan Turing, the man who laid the foundations for the modern-day computer, pioneered research into artificial intelligence and unlocked German wartime codes.
His death, a decade after the end of the war, provides the link with Apple. Unrecognized for his work, facing jail for gross indecency and humiliated by estrogen injections intended to ‘cure’ his homosexuality, he bit into an apple he had laced with cyanide. He died in obscurity on June 7, 1954, 10 years and a day after the Normandy landings, which made copious use of intelligence gleaned by his methods.
And so, the story goes, when two Stanford entrepreneurs were looking for a logo for their brand new computer company, they remembered Turing and his contribution to their field. They chose an apple — not a complete apple, but one with a bite taken out of it.
Sadly, the truth is rarely as simple, or beautiful, as we would like. I first researched this story in 2005 and was assured by someone at Apple that it was indeed true. The article struck a chord and several people got in touch to say how pleased or touched they were to hear the story.


Steve Jobs leaves lasting legacy


A look back at the life of Steve Jobs


Odd Jobs tributes
A few years later I mentioned it to another Apple employee, who immediately said that he thought it was a myth. It may have started around the time of the 2001 film about the Bletchley Park code breakers, Enigma, or it may have just resurfaced then. He checked with Apple headquarters, and although they were non-committal, it was clear that that Turing story was not official Apple history.
Other theories were advanced. The apple represented knowledge, as in the biblical story of Adam and Eve, or referenced the falling fruit that led Sir Isaac Newton to the concept of gravity. Supporters of the latter theory note the name of Apple’s handheld PDA, the Newton, but that was more than a decade after the creation of the logo.
Sadly, the evidence now points in a more prosaic direction. In a 2009 interview with CreativeBits, Rob Janoff, the man who drew the logo, reflected on the theories about his work. He dismisses Sir Isaac or the Bible as source material and, while he says he is charmed by the links with the Turing story, he says he was unaware of them at the time.
"I’m afraid it didn’t have a thing to do with it," he said. "It’s a wonderful urban legend."

Janoff says that he received no specific brief from Steve Jobs, and although he’s hazy about how he settled on the simple outline of an apple, the reason for the bite is crystal clear: it’s there for scale, he says, so that a small Apple logo still looks like an apple and not a cherry.

matt112830:

sharplydressedtentacles:

banesidhe:

calming-tea:

samrgarrett:

outofthecavern:

opiatevampire:

theworldisconfused:

In addition to essentially inventing the computer, Alan Turing also broke the German Enigma Code during World War II which paved the way for the D-Day invasion. The man was a hyper-genius. I’ve read descriptions of his work by mathematical physicist Sir Roger Penrose. He’s been a hero of mine ever since.

The level of thought required to come up with the stuff he came up with is totally beyond my comprehension. I actually did not even know about his orientation until much later. He was prosecuted and ordered to undergo chemical castration. Soon thereafter, he committed suicide by eating a cyanide-laced apple.

The government forced him to take estrogen as a punishment (or “cure”?). He began to develop breasts and other side effects.

He committed suicide by biting into a cyanide laced apple. This is supposedly the inspiration for the name/logo of Apple computers.

omfg

omfg

and old Apple computers

the apple was a rainbow 

image

image

image

Reblogging again because more people need to know about Turing dammit.

Whoa…

(CNN) — If beauty is indeed truth, as John Keats claimed, then this story ought to be true: The logo on the back of your iPhone or Mac is a tribute to Alan Turing, the man who laid the foundations for the modern-day computer, pioneered research into artificial intelligence and unlocked German wartime codes.

His death, a decade after the end of the war, provides the link with Apple. Unrecognized for his work, facing jail for gross indecency and humiliated by estrogen injections intended to ‘cure’ his homosexuality, he bit into an apple he had laced with cyanide. He died in obscurity on June 7, 1954, 10 years and a day after the Normandy landings, which made copious use of intelligence gleaned by his methods.

And so, the story goes, when two Stanford entrepreneurs were looking for a logo for their brand new computer company, they remembered Turing and his contribution to their field. They chose an apple — not a complete apple, but one with a bite taken out of it.

Sadly, the truth is rarely as simple, or beautiful, as we would like. I first researched this story in 2005 and was assured by someone at Apple that it was indeed true. The article struck a chord and several people got in touch to say how pleased or touched they were to hear the story.


Steve Jobs leaves lasting legacy

A look back at the life of Steve Jobs

Odd Jobs tributes

A few years later I mentioned it to another Apple employee, who immediately said that he thought it was a myth. It may have started around the time of the 2001 film about the Bletchley Park code breakers, Enigma, or it may have just resurfaced then. He checked with Apple headquarters, and although they were non-committal, it was clear that that Turing story was not official Apple history.

Other theories were advanced. The apple represented knowledge, as in the biblical story of Adam and Eve, or referenced the falling fruit that led Sir Isaac Newton to the concept of gravity. Supporters of the latter theory note the name of Apple’s handheld PDA, the Newton, but that was more than a decade after the creation of the logo.

Sadly, the evidence now points in a more prosaic direction. In a 2009 interview with CreativeBits, Rob Janoff, the man who drew the logo, reflected on the theories about his work. He dismisses Sir Isaac or the Bible as source material and, while he says he is charmed by the links with the Turing story, he says he was unaware of them at the time.

"I’m afraid it didn’t have a thing to do with it," he said. "It’s a wonderful urban legend."

Janoff says that he received no specific brief from Steve Jobs, and although he’s hazy about how he settled on the simple outline of an apple, the reason for the bite is crystal clear: it’s there for scale, he says, so that a small Apple logo still looks like an apple and not a cherry.

(Source: communism-kills, via randomneesly-awesome)

Filed under alan turing urban legend myth apple computers

114 notes

itslikealittleprayer:

Screw writing “strong” women. Write interesting women. Write well-rounded women. Write complicated women. Write a woman who cowers in a corner. Write a woman who’s desperate for a husband. Write a woman who doesn’t need a man. Write women who cry, women who rant, women who are shy, women who don’t take no shit, women who need validation and women who don’t care what anybody thinks. They are all okay, and all those things could exist in the same woman.

Women shouldn’t be valued because we are strong, or kick-ass, but because we are people. So don’t focus on writing characters who are strong. Write characters who are people.(x)

(via foreveranevilregal)